I am NOT an exterminator!

December 17, 2011

A prominent article in the latest issue of PCT magazine titled “I Am An Exterminator!” drew my attention. It had to have been written by one of those great old timers in the industry – with old ideas that still are at the core of what’s wrong with the pest control industry. Fortunately, there are new and better voices representing the pest control industry.
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When Pests Are Not Pests

August 16, 2011

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This past spring I was in Estonia when I joined my wife’s business trip to the University of Tartu for a scientific convention. We traveled from Riga, Latvia to Tartu and Tallinn, Estonia and then to Helsinki, Finland.

It was wonderful to see how The Baltic Republics have gone through a revival since the demise of the Soviet Union. Three typical housing styles were evident everywhere. There was the old and elegant housing for the wealthy prior to the Soviet era. There was the bland, stark grey and unadorned housing of the Soviet era (which I didn’t bother photographing). Lastly, there was the new modern housing and where we were staying, some beautiful renovations of downtown commercial nightlife and cafe shops.
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The Yin Yang of Sales and Service

May 7, 2011

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When weighing the benefits of having one sales team and one separate service team vs. a combined sales/service team I believe something may be missing in the equation.

When you have separate sales and service teams the assumption is that they are assigned to do what they do best. Certainly you can maximize the selling ability of sales people by not burdening them with service. Likewise, you would not want to burden service people with sales opportunities they cannot close.
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Fascination with Death – Professional Choices

February 8, 2011

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If you thought pest control was a strange profession, try being a professional mortician. In this article, Alexandra Mosca describes a variety of reasons why she became a mortician and how she conducts herself. One motivation was the desire to comfort people passing through a difficult transition, as she had with the death of a loved one. But a deeper confession was that she always had a fascination with death.
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If Service People Can’t Sell…

October 21, 2010

In pest control there is a division between companies with “universal pest control technicians” and those with the belief that service people are service people and salespeople are salespeople. There are good reasons to separate the sales and service function. One would be that you can devote full time to one or the other. Another is the belief that fundamentally these personality types are so different that you need separate functionality to put in place the best sales team and the best service team.
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Food Grade vs. Pool Grade Diatomaceous Earth – Possible Confusion

July 2, 2010

Speaking with an industry associate recently, we were discussing the use of diatomaceus earth. A concern was expressed about using diatomaceous earth. I thought, maybe folks are confused by the many different types of diatomaceous earth.

For pest control, the only type of diatomaceous earth you should be using is “Food Grade” diatomaceous earth. “Pool Grade” diatomaceous earth has been chemically processed and is carcenogenic. Read the rest of this entry »


Is the Future of Pest Control Tied to Conservation?

June 10, 2010

I’m getting tired of killing bees. Yes, I have recognized many situations where bees are extremely dangerous and something needs to be done quickly. In our own company experience several years ago, we had a worker who came within a minute of death due to anaphylactic shock. It is so difficult to find an economically feasible way to save them. I don’t trust any of the current companies out there that claim to save them. But I do believe it can be done, with extensive training, if you could create a network of bee hive takers. It’s no easy job. But who said work was easy.
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